Sideshow chosen as a Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards finalist

At the end of the day yesterday, I got some wonderful news: Sideshow has been chosen as a Foreword Reviews’ prestigious Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards finalist in the LGBT category!

I am beyond honored by this and so grateful that this little book that I poured so much of my heart into is resonating with others.

To celebrate, Interlude Press is offering all award-nominated books in their catalog for 25% off. So if you haven’t picked up your copy yet, head on over.

 

INDIES finalists are moved on to final judging by an expert panel of librarians and booksellers curated specifically for each genre and who will determine the books who will be named Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Award winners. Winners in each genre—along with Editor’s Choice winners, and Foreword’s INDIE Publisher of the Year—will be announced during the 2017 American Library Association Annual Conference in Chicago on June 24, 2017.

Check out a full list of finalists

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My pencils outlast their erasers. [Deleted Scenes!]

“I have rewritten—often several times—every word I have ever published. My pencils outlast their erasers.” —Vladimir Nabokov, Speak, Memory

Interviewer: How much rewriting do you do?
Hemingway: It depends. I rewrote the ending of Farewell to Arms, the last page of it, 39 times before I was satisfied.
Interviewer: Was there some technical problem there? What was it that had stumped you?
Hemingway: Getting the words right. —Ernest Hemingway, The Paris Review Interview, 1956

I strongly believe in the rewrite. I think I may have driven more than one editor insane by how strongly I believe in it. Sometimes, to me at least, the first half of the writing process is about scribbling things down as you find and sort the story, then the second half is making sure that the words are exactly right to convey that story. For some stories the first half is a much longer journey than the second one. That was the case for Sideshow.

If I gave you the following one sentence summary: “Detroit 1955: A young pregnant waitress on the run joins a traveling carnival to hide from both her father and her boyfriend’s killer.” Would you even think for a moment that this was from the snowflake outline (the method I use for diagramming my initial novel ideas) of Sideshow?

Sideshow went through many, many , many changes before it made it’s way to the publisher and even more before it actually went to print. This didn’t shock me at all. It happens all the time with my work and I’m sure a lot of writers will agree.

And all of this is a long, roundabout way of saying that today we have deleted scenes! I’ve selected a few of my favorite scenes that were cut from Sideshow during the process of writing and rewriting. Enjoy! (and maybe if you ask really nicely I’ll share the “alternate ending” or rather the ending I never finished because it went off the rails.)

Italian Cookies

1st we have the original end to Abby and Suprema’s first date in which they run into Abby’s Aunt Teresa. Ultimately, I didn’t feel that it was necessary to actually introduce this character (yet) and that she was more impactful off the page.

Abby stood up from the table and offered her arm to Suprema. They started for the door, but were stopped in their tracks as a well dressed woman in a circle skirt bustled in, arms full of packages. Something familiar in her face caught Abby’s eye and she continued to watch as the woman made her way to the counter and set her packages down. “I’ve got another 4 dozen of the seed cookies here,” she said in a light airy way that seemed calibrated to hide an accent. Even that sounded familiar to Abby.

“Right, Signora Holland,” said the woman behind the counter. “And I’ve got your money here for them, just a minute.”

“Therese, please,” she asked, trying to sound friendlier while still effecting the right vowels. “I’m Therese here, Maria.”

Maria frowned, but she nodded and hurried away from the counter.

“Do you know her?” Suprema asked, her voice gently, but prodding. Only then did Abby realize that not only she was holding onto her arm much too tightly, but she was also blocking the aisle.

“I-I think so,” she whispered. “I think she might be my aunt.”

When Maria had handed Abby’s Aunt Teresa the money, she turned to go. Abby wanted to duck behind a booth, but there was no time. Teresa turned directly toward Abby and Suprema and put her hand to her heart with a small gasp. “Ninfa?” Her accent was back in its rightful place.

“Abby,” Abby corrected, still holding tightly to Suprema’s arm. She needed something, anything, to ground her.

“What are you- When did you- How did-?” She trailed off, glancing around the restaurant. The rest of the patrons were all looking pointedly at their lunches, pretending not to hear. She looked Abby over, examining every inch of her. “You look so much like your mother. I thought I was seeing a ghost.”

“I’ve been told that,” Abby said, trying to keep a frown from flitting onto her face.

“It’s been a long time.” Teresa fidgeted as she looked around the restaurant, not daring to look at Abby for too long.

“It has.” Abby looked right at her taking her in. She barely remember her from her youth. It had been ages since she had last laid eyes on her and even those memories were quite hazy.

“I’m sorry I couldn’t make it to the- Well, you know. The timing was bad for traveling. Things are different for me now. I’d just remarried. He’s English, and he wasn’t ready, well, to meet my family.” She pointedly met Abby’s eye as if suddenly trying to send her a secret signal.

Abby looked away so that she couldn’t see it, as if that could keep her from understanding it. She didn’t want to admit that she knew exactly what her aunt was trying to say, but she did. “Oh,” was all she could say in response.

“If you need anything though, anything at all.” Teresa began to reach out and take her niece by the hand, but was unable to complete the action. Abruptly she retracted and sped out the door without another word.

Abby remained frozen to the spot until Suprema lightly touched the back of her hand and startled her from the trance. “So that was your aunt?” she asked in a tentative voice.

“I don’t really know,” Abby said. Her eyes were stinging and she knew that she had to fight the tears back as hard as she could. “I guess not.”

Suprema frowned, a knowing expression on her face. It was a look that Abby could read with ease. She had seen it on the faces of so many of the other carnival workers: a defiant understanding of loneliness. “Come on then,” she whispered, sounding suddenly firm and resolute. “We don’t need her.”

lets spend the afternoon in a cold hot air balloon

2nd is another favorite of mine: the hot air balloon. This was one of the first scenes I wrote and I still love it. Originally, hot air balloons played a large roll in the plot, however, when I started researching I quickly learned that hot air ballooning was not really a recreational activity until well into the 1960s (Seriously, I didn’t believe it either, but it’s true!). Oops. So all of that had to go, but I still think this little scene had some lovely magic.

Abby’s eyes lit up as she watched the world below drift away. She had always imagined that something like this would terrify her, but instead she felt exhilarated. The carnival, the city, everything became small and suddenly manageable, as if by changing her perspective, she could now take on the world. Finally Della’s comment about being born on the ground made sense.

“Suprema, this is…This is incredible. How often do you come up here?”

“Not often. Only when I really need to think about something.”

Below, the roofs of houses, the highways, the river, looked like a child’s drawing. Abby squeezed her eyes shut, trying to fix the image in her mind.

“You aren’t scared are you?” Suprema asked, genuine concern in her voice.

Abby shook her head. “I’m trying to remember this moment.”

“Don’t. You’ll miss it.” She slipped her arm around Abby’s waist and Abby automatically leaned into her. The pair stayed that way, silently watching the scenes of the city play out beneath them, until, eventually, Suprema broken the silence. “I don’t want you to leave.”

Abby looked up, suddenly taken aback. “You’d be the only one.”

“That’s not true. We all care about you, Abby. You’re one of us.”

The scoff escaped before Abby could corral it. “Far from it. Della made that painfully clear.”

“Della,” Suprema scoffed as well. “What does Della know?”

Before Abby could intercede on Della’s behalf, Suprema had continued. “I know I’m not…my opinion doesn’t count for much, but…I want you to stay. I need you to stay.”

Abby watched her eyes. The usual sadness was there, but there was something more behind them, something hopeful and warm. Abby had seen it a few times before, but this time it was different, it shone. “Why?” she said, pulling out of Suprema’s embrace.

“You’re nice,” Suprema began. “Phebe adores you. Vinnie practically wants to adopt you.”

“They’ve all gotten along fine before now. They’ll get along fine after I go home.”

“There’s also…” Suprema hesitated and looked around as if she might see a stowaway on the balloon eavesdropping on their conversation. “Well, there’s also the fact that I love you.”

This, Abby had not been expecting. She stared hard at Suprema’s face, the warm look in her eyes growing to almost a beacon. “You-”

“Was it not obvious?”

Without stopping to breath, Abby threw her arms around Suprema. The basket of the balloon tossed just a little, but neither of them seemed to mind. “No,” Abby whispered. “No, it wasn’t obvious.”

Suprema brushed a strand of Abby’s hair from her face and gazed at her. “I’m not very good at-”

Abby shook her head. “You don’t need to explain.” Then she kissed her. The thrill of being miles above the earth could not even begin to compare to the thrill of that one kiss.

To read how it really goes, pick up a copy of Sideshow from Interlude Press.

Listening to the Sounds of the Midway [Playlist]

It’s been a month since Sideshow was officially launched and I cannot thank you all enough for the amazing response my little book has received so far. I poured a great deal of my heart into that novel and I’m so glad to see that it has resonated with so many of you as well. For this week’s blog post I’ve put together a little thank you gift.

Mixed tapes used to be one of my favorite ways of expressing myself back in the pre-ipod days. I used to spend hours and hours deciding exactly which songs fit the mood and message I was trying to convey, putting them in exactly the right order, designing the label with my giant set of different colored Sharpie markers, etc before bequeathing it to the intended recipient. Those days are pretty much gone now as most people I know wouldn’t have the means to play a mixed tape/CD, but that doesn’t mean I can’t still gather songs into a playlist and obsess over creating the exact right message with them. So, without further ado, I present to you the playlist I have been obsessing over for the past month: “The Sideshow Soundtrack!”

Can’t It Be Summer Forever?

Rides Galore

I can’t believe it’s already the last official day of the virtual book tour. I had such a good time and got to know some amazing bloggers. I can’t thank them enough for their support and hosting of tour stops. Really it’s been a blast.

It was almost 90 degrees today and as far as I’m concerned summer could last forever! But don’t you fret, I still have plenty of great content to keep us going long after the book tour ends, but in the meantime, check out these great tour stops.

Wicked Faerie’s Tales and Reviews: In which we delve into how I develop my characters and some of my real-life inspirations.

Charley Descoteaux

Making the Jump

One cow, one ferris wheel

I practically missed Labor Day because I was canning ~32 quarts of tomato sauce and salsa, a well over 12 hour endeavor. I’m still not ready to switch over into fall though, so let’s hang onto summer a little longer with a few more book tour stops, shall we?

9/5

Divine Magazine: In which we discuss Abby’s home life and some books that made me think differently about historical fiction as a genre.

Havan Fellows: Fun, rapid fire questions including the show I’m currently binge watching and the 2 biggest crushes I had in the 90s.

9/6

Alpha Book Club: In which we delve into what my goals were for Sideshow and whether or not I think I accomplished them.

Molly Lolly: In which Abby talks music (and a review!)

Ferris Wheel At Sunset

Going Inside the Show Tent

Circus Tent

Two more great tour stops! I am loving this book tour so far, so many great blogs and bloggers.

Foxylutely Book Reviews In which I discuss the unspoken criteria I have for whether or not I call myself a writer.

Bonkers About Books: Tour stop and interview  In which I discuss my book launch celebratory purchase: a dress the color of champagne

A Few New Stops on the Route Card

Christiani Bros. Circus, 1956

Be sure to check out today’s tour stops and remember to enter the giveaways!

Open Skye Book Reviews  In which I discuss my ideal super power and my cats’ future fame

Prism Book Alliance In which I discuss how a day job impacts my writing and apologize for my bad wine habits.

Happily Ever Chapter  In which I delve into writing anxiety and why deadlines are actually the best.